Extended Deadline: NYPPP 2016 – Phenomenology of Emotions

The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy (2016) Invites submissions on the following topic: 

Phenomenology of Emotions: Systematic and Historical Perspectives

Guest Editors:
Ignacio Quepons (Seattle University)
Rodney K.B. Parker (Western University)

 

The emotions (Gefühlen, Stimmungen) have been a topic of phenomenological analysis since the beginning of the phenomenological movement.  In recent years there has been a general turn toward a serious reconsideration of emotional experience in philosophy and in the social and cognitive sciences.  This has led to an increased interest in the phenomenological descriptions of emotion developed by Edmund Husserl and his early followers, and how their work might shed light on current problems and debates.

We welcome submissions on systematic and historical aspects of the phenomenology of emotions, with emphasis on Husserl and the early reception of his work on emotion; current developments in phenomenology of emotions; valuing and action in phenomenology; and historically informed discussions of the problem of the intentionality of emotions, moods, or feelings within phenomenological research. The writings of Franz Brentano, Edmund Husserl, Carl Stumpf, Theodor Lipps, Moritz Geiger, Alexander Pfänder, Max Scheler, Maximilian Beck, Else Voigtländer, Margarete Calinich, Aurel Kolnai, and Stephan Strasser, among others, are of particular interest. We are open to receive contributions on the topic of intentionality of emotions in other philosophical traditions if the paper emphasizes, compares or criticizes an important aspect of the phenomenological account of emotions.

Articles can be no longer than 75.000 characters, including spaces and footnotes. All submissions should be prepared for blind review, and sent to queponsi@seattleu.edu or iquepons@gmail.com no later than the extended deadline of 5 February, 2016.

 

Confirmed invited contributors:

Anthony Steinbock (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)

Antonio Zirión Q. (National and Autonomous University of Mexico)

Ingrid Vendrell Ferran (University of Marburg)

Mariano Crespo (University of Navarra)

John Drummond (Fordham University)

Panos Theodorou (University of Crete)

Please circulate the following .pdf widelyNYPPP 2016 call for papers

CFP – Discipline Filosofiche XXVI, 1, 2016. Phenomenological Ontologies

Call for Papers

Thematic Issue Of Discipline Filosofiche XXVI, 1, 2016. Phenomenological Ontologies: Individuality, Essence, Idea.

Volume Editors: Simona Bertolini And Faustino Fabbianelli

Thematic Issue of Discipline Filosofiche XXVI, 1, 2016: Phenomenological Ontologies: Individuality, Essence, Idea. Volume Editors: Simona Bertolini and Faustino Fabbianelli

Husserl’s interest in the concepts of eidos and essence marked the beginning of the phenomenological debate about how to define and distinguish them. In the twenty years following the publication of Jean Hering’s “Bemerkungen über das Wesen, die Wesenheit und die Idee” (1921), several attempts have been made to examine the structure of essence and idea, with respect to their relation to individual objects. In the works of Roman Ingarden and Herbert Spiegelberg, and even in those of more independent phenomenologists like Edith Stein and Nicolai Hartmann, these concepts were the primary subject of systematic investigation ranging from the self-foundation of  eidetic science (as in Ingarden’s ontological project) to Stein’s reinterpretation of Thomistic metaphysics. The phenomenological model offers a ground for the development of a variety of ontologies that, despite differences in their methodological assumptions, share a common focus on the objectual conditions of eidetic vision, thus expanding the thematic field of phenomenology and connecting it with the age-old questions of traditional metaphysics. The reality of individual objects, whether “bracketed” or not, is considered by the cited philosophers as the base of an ontological structure that has the multiplicity of essences and the ideal dimension as determining moments. The aim of our issue is to explore this field of discussion developed within the phenomenological tradition after the publication of Hering’s essay. Among the topics we invite authors to consider:

1) the definitions of and distinctions between the concepts of idea and essence;

2) the different methodological contexts and possible meanings of the phenomenological ontology underlying such a discussion;

3) comparisons to past metaphysics (Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, etc.).

Submission guidelines: Submission can be made in English, Italian, French, and German and should not exceed 9,000 words including abstract, references and footnotes. Manuscripts are welcome in English, Italian, German or French. They should be prepared for anonymous refereeing and sent by email attachment in Microsoft Word together with a .pdf version to Simona Bertolinibertolini1980@gmail.com Contributions are sent to two independent reviewers in a double-blind procedure prior to the publication decision. Authors may be requested to change or improve their articles when suggested by reviewers. Please attach both a fully blinded version of your paper as a “Manuscript” and a separate “Cover page” indicating full name of the authors, academic title, university affiliation and full contact details. The submission should contain an abstract in English, not exceeding 150 words. For further details, please see guidelines (all submissions will be acknowledged). Submitted manuscripts can be formatted in any clear and consistent style, but authors finalizing their papers for publication will be required to hand in a final version that respects the journal’s stylistic rules (download Style guidelines).Submission of a manuscript is understood to imply that the paper has not been published before and is not being considered for publication by any other journal. The publication of the papers implies that authors waive the copyright; they could request the copyright to the journal for future publication of them.

Deadline for submission: February  28, 2016.

Notification of acceptance, conditional acceptance, rejection: April 15, 2016.

Final version due: May 31, 2016.

Reading Room Update – Migration plans and Ernst von Aster

NASEP is pleased to announce that we are now beginning to migrate the contents of our Reading Room to the Open Commons of Phenomenology platform (along with the NASEP blog itself). We want to thank all of our users for supporting and promoting the contents of our Reading Room, and we look forward to expanding our collection during the migration process.

As we make our move, we will be updating you on new additions to the Reading Room as we have in the past. We apologize that new material has been slow to appear over the past few months.

The first set of writings to move over to the OPhen platform are those of Ernst von Aster. More items will be added to von Aster’s bibliography as we receive them.

Ernst von Aster was born in Berlin on 18 February 1880. In the summer semester of 1898, von Aster began his university education in Berlin studying mathematics, natural science, and philosophy. He later moved to the University of Munich where he studied under Hans Cornelius and Theodor Lipps, and was an active member of the Psychologische Verein. He completed his dissertation with Lipps on 25 May 1902. The dissertation, Über Aufgabe und Methode in den Beweisen der Analogien der Erfahrung in Kants Kritik der reinen Vernunft, was published in the Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie in 1903. Von Aster remained in Munich to write his Habilitation thesis, Untersuchungen über den logischen Gehalt des Kausalgesetzes, which he completed on 24 July, 1905.

In the summer semester of 1906, von Aster began teaching at the rank of Privatdozent in Munich (his first courses were Grundzüge der Ethik and Über Wesen und Aufgabe des psychologischen Experiments und der psychologischen Beobachtung). Sometime in August 1912, he was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor of Philosophy (though the university course calendar does not reflect this change in status until summer semester 1913). He remained in Munich until WS 1920/21, at which point he became the successor of Hermann Siebeck as the chair of Philosophy and Pedagogy at the University of Giessen.

After the National Socialist party came to power in 1933, von Aster lost his chair at Giessen for being a Social Democrat, and fled to Sweden. In 1936, von Aster was appointed full Professor at the University of Istanbul. Edmund Husserl wrote a letter of recommendation on his behalf. Von Aster died in Stockholm on 22 October, 1948.

Prof. von Aster (bottom left).

                     Prof. von Aster (bottom left).

For more information on Ernst von Aster, see:

  • Hans Michael Baumgartner. 1981. Unbeirrbarkeit und Würde der Philosophie. Zum Gedächtnis des 100. Geburtstages von Ernst von Aster. Zeitschrift für philosophische Forschung 35:2, 259-263.
  • Regine Mader. 1981. Bibliographie Ernst von Aster (1880-1948). Zeitschrift für philosophische Forschung 35:2, 263-267

CFA – Aristotle in Phenomenology

Call for abstracts

Aristotle in Phenomenology

April 23-24, 2016

Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne
Fort Wayne, Indiana

Aristotelian concepts persist in the works of Franz Brentano, who was a prolific Aristotle commentator as well as Edmund Husserl’s teacher. Later phenomenologists continue to exhibit both implicit and explicit Aristotelianism. The purpose of this conference is to elucidate the effect of Aristotle’s writings on phenomenology and the history of phenomenology.

Abstracts should be 300-500 words, prepared for blind review.

Please submit abstracts and current CV to Dr. Charlene Elsby at elsbyc@ipfw.edu.

Deadline for submissions is 15 January, 2016.

Notifications of acceptance will be sent out February 15th, 2016.

See PhilEvents here: http://philevents.org/event/show/18569

Sponsored by the Philosophy Department and the College of Arts and Sciences at IPFW.

CFA – NASEP 2016

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

The North American Society for Early Phenomenology

in conjunction with

The Max Scheler Society of North America

Presents 

Feeling, Valuing, and Judging: Phenomenological Investigations in Axiology

May 19th-21st, 2016

St. John’s University – Manhattan Campus

Invited Speakers

  • Anthony Steinbock (Southern Illinois University – Carbondale)
  • John Drummond (Fordham University)
  • James Dodd (New School for Social Research)

Call for Abstracts

Feelings, values, and judgements all played central roles in the philosophical writings of the early phenomenologists – from their discussions of formalism in ethics, to social ontology, the phenomenology of moods and emotions, and even the phenomenology of religion. Though heavily inspired by the work of Edmund Husserl, Max Scheler and the Munich phenomenologists conceived phenomenology as less a method and more an attitude, and developed their phenomenological investigations accordingly. With the phenomenological attitude, the meaning of the object of cognition is revealed. Doxic, volitional, and affective intentional attitudes gives rise to phenomenological descriptions of the world in terms of its meaning and value. Understood in this way, the early phenomenologists saw questions of value as arising alongside questions of ontology.

The theme of this conference will be phenomenological studies in axiology (ethics and aesthetics), and will look at the relationship of intuition, the emotions, and intersubjectivity to acts of feeling, valuing, and judging. Topics include phenomenological theories of valuation, the departure of later phenomenologists from Husserl’s and Brentano’s distinctions of types of mental phenomena, axiological properties of intentional objects, the self as a member of a community, sympathy and empathy, criteria for correct and incorrect value judgments, the difference between axiological and ontic characteristics and fact-value differentiation, axiology in universals and particulars, judgments of value and the role of implicit beliefs, phenomenological descriptions of striving, volition, emotions, moods, the beautiful and the sublime, etc. We encourage papers on the work of Franz Brentano, Edmund Husserl, Theodor Lipps, Max Scheler, Alexander Pfänder, Moritz Geiger, Josef Geyser, Dietrich von Hildebrand, Siegfried Hamburger, Nicolai Hartmann, Waldemar Conrad, Aurel Kolnai, Roman Ingarden, Edith Stein, Emmanuel Levinas, Hans Reiner, and others. We are also interested in papers proposing original phenomenological descriptions of emotions, feelings, volition, and judgments that follow the phenomenological tradition, and build upon these historical antecedents in new and interesting ways.

Abstracts should be 500-700 words, and include a short bibliography of primary and secondary sources.  All abstracts must be prepared for blind review and sent via email in .doc or .docx format to Dr. Rodney Parker at: (rodney.k.b.parker@gmail.com).

Both senior researchers and graduate students are encouraged to submit.

Deadline for submissions is: December 15, 2015.

Click here for a .pdf version of the call for abstracts.

CFP – Women Phenomenologists on Social Ontology

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

Women Phenomenologists

on

Social Ontology

February 11-13th 2016
University of Paderborn, Germany

~

Description

Contrary to many movements in the history of philosophy, the “Phenomenological Movement” has from its beginnings included numerous female philosophers. They contributed substantially to the phenomenological project by developing outstanding philosophical accounts and addressing problems, which remain relevant until today. Phenomenology’s exceptionally modern outlook, not to let oneself be influenced by traditional authorities, but rather to only receive guidance from ”the things themselves”, allowed its female proponents to achieve a position in the academic world few women could enjoy at the time. From today’s perspective, the most noteworthy issues that some of the prominent female phenomenologists elaborated on fall under the scope of what one would today label social ontology and political philosophy.

The conference will investigate specifically the contribution of women phenomenologists in this field. The programme focuses on, but is not restricted to, the following philosophers: Hannah Arendt, Luce Irigaray, Edith Stein, Hedwig Conrad-Martius and Gerda Walther.

For full and up-to-date information, please visit the official conference website regularly.

The list of invited speakers includes:

Prof. Dr. Sigridur Thorgeirsdottir
University of Iceland/University of Helsinki, Finland

Prof. Dr. Ronny Miron
Bar-Ilan University, Israel

Prof. Dr. Antonio Calcagno
Western University, Canada

Prof. Dr. Hans Bernhard Schmid
University of Wien, Austria

Prof. Dr. Julia Jansen
KU Leuven, Belgium

Prof. Dr. Sara Heinämaa
University of Jyväskylä, Finland

Prof. Dr. Sebastian Luft
Marquette University, USA/University of Paderborn, Germany

Prof. Dr. Ruth Hagengruber
University of Paderborn, Germany

Dr. Michela Summa
University of Würzburg, Germany

Dr. Alessandro Salice
University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Dr. Thomas Szanto
University of Wien, Austria

Dr. Anna Varga-Jani
Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary

Registration

Presentations by invited speakers will take place on February 11th and 12th. To register, please send an e-mail to Julia Mühl jmuehl@mail.upb.de. The registration fee of 10 € will be collected upon arrival. It will be also possible to make reservations for the conference dinner (February 11th) for 40€. The event will be followed by a graduate and post-graduate student conference on “Women Phenomenologists on Social Ontology,” February 13th 2016 at the University of Paderborn.

Call for Papers

Submission guidelines:

Presentation of the papers should take a maximum of 30 minutes and will be followed by a general discussion (15 min). Proposal for papers should include the speaker’s name and institutional affiliation, title and an abstract (up to 300 words). The conference language is English.
The submission deadline is November 1st 2015.

Notification of paper acceptance will be given by December 15th 2015.
The best paper by a graduate/post-graduate student will be awarded a prize of 100 €.
Download as PDF: Link

Contact

In case of any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us:
Dr. Maria Robaszkiewicz, maria.robaszkiewicz@upb.de
Julia Mühl, jmuehl@mail.upb.de

Conference organizers:

Prof. Dr. Ruth Hagengruber & Prof. Dr. Sebastian Luft

NYPPP 2016 – Phenomenology of Emotions: Systematic and Historical Perspectives

The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy (2016)

Invites submissions on the following topic: 

Phenomenology of Emotions:
Systematic and Historical Perspectives

Guest Editors: Rodney K.B. Parker & Ignacio Quepons

The emotions (Gefühlen, Stimmungen) have been a topic of phenomenological analysis since the beginning of the phenomenological movement.  In recent years there has been a general turn toward a serious reconsideration of emotional experience in philosophy and in the social and cognitive sciences.  This has led to an increased interest in the phenomenological descriptions of emotion developed by Edmund Husserl and his early followers, and how their work might shed light on current problems and debates.

We welcome submissions on systematic and historical aspects of the phenomenology of emotions, with emphasis on Husserl and the early reception of his work on emotion; current developments in phenomenology of emotions; valuing and action in transcendental phenomenology; and the historical antecedents of the problem of the intentionality of emotions within phenomenological research. The writings of Franz Brentano, Edmund Husserl, Carl Stumpf, Theodor Lipps, Moritz Geiger, Alexander Pfänder, Max Scheler, Maximilian Beck, Else Voigtländer, Margarete Calinich, Aurel Kolnai and Stephan Strasser, among others, are of particular interest. We are open to receive contributions on the topic of intentionality of emotions in other philosophical traditions if the paper emphasizes, compares or criticizes an important aspect of the phenomenological account of emotions.

Articles can be no longer than 75.000 characters, including spaces and footnotes. All submissions should be prepared for blind review, and sent to queponsi@seattleu.edu by 30 December, 2015.

Confirmed invited contributors:

Anthony Steinbock Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Antonio Zirión Q. National and Autonomous University of Mexico
Ingrid Vendrell Ferran University of Marburg
Mariano Crespo University of Navarra
John Drummond  Fordham University
Panos Theodorou University of Crete

Summer School of Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy

Ca’ Foscari University of Venice
Ca' Foscari University of Venice
Department of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage

hosts the 3rd Annual

SUMMER SCHOOL OF PHENOMENOLOGY AND PHENOMENOLOGICAL PHILOSOPHY:

 PHENOMENOLOGY AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

 VENICE, JULY 07-10, 2015

The Department of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage of Ca’ Foscari University Venice (Italy) is pleased to host the third edition of the SSPPP (Summer School of Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy), 07-10.7.2015.

Seminars will be led by:

  • Patrice Canivez (University of Lille)
  • Daniele de Santis (Seattle University)
  • Nicolas de Warren (Husserl Archives at KU Leuven)
  • Matteo Giannasi  (Ca’ Foscari University Venice)
  • Burt Hopkins (Seattle University)
  • Edouard Jolly (University of Leuven)
  • Claudio Majolino (University of Lille)
  • Darian Meacham (University of the West of England)
  • Gianluigi Paltrinieri (Ca’ Foscari University Venice)
  • Emiliano Trizio (Seattle University)

SSPPP Program  |  Abstracts  |  Faculty Info

PHENOMENOLOGY AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

The relation between phenomenology and political philosophy can be ranged among the least investigated themes of the phenomenological tradition, to the point that it is legitimate to claim that the potentialities of this field of study have barely begun to be explored. The reasons for this widespread and persistent forgetfulness are often deemed to be rooted in the history of phenomenology itself, which has been marked by the predominance of foundational issues revolving chiefly around the theory of knowledge (Husserl) and the problem of being (Heidegger). Indeed, although a number of prominent authors belonging to this tradition have produced a considerable amount of work on social and political philosophy, and have, for better or worse, actively participated to the political life of their time, it is not always clear to what extent their contribution to the reflection on social and political issues stems from their phenomenological outlook, rather than being just juxtaposed to it. This is true both of Heidegger’s tragic proximity to Nazism, and of the Marxist creed predominant among some post-war phenomenologists. Subsequently, the so-called end of ideologies and the predominance of an apolitical academic style of philosophy have widened the gulf between a highly technical discipline such as phenomenology and the reflection on the surrounding political and social context. Ethical and broadly existential issues have thus replaced the strongly political and practical concerns of authors such as Jean-Paul Sartre in France, Enzo Paci in Italy or Ludwig Landgrebe in Germany, to name a few. Yet, more recently, a number of works has renewed the interest in the way in which phenomenology can give a valuable contribution to issues fundamental to political philosophy: intersubjectivity, life-world, the constitution of social and cultural objects, the concepts of state and democracy, power, authority and technology, the reflection on the meaning of history and on the philosophical idea of Europe. Consequently, it has now become possible to highlight an underlying political motive that permeates 20th Century phenomenology since its inception (from Husserl to Patočka, from Heidegger to Arendt), reassess the judgments of its most prominent critiques (from the Frankfurt School to various post-modern appraisals) and, further, to pave the way to new original phenomenological investigations in this area, as well as to a confrontation with other major trends in political philosophy.

No previous background in phenomenology is required. On the final day of the seminar, advanced students will be encouraged to give a personal contribution to the School’s activities.

Language: English

The number of attendants being limited, a selection will take place among aspirant students. Applicants are kindly requested to send a CV and a sample of writing (optional) to phenomenologysummerschool@gmail.com

Deadline for application: May 23, 2015 (Late applicants will be shortlisted and contacted on the basis of the number of attendants).

Notification of acceptance: May 24, 2015

The event is organized and sponsored by the Department of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage of Ca’ Foscari University Venice.

Participation fee: 100 euro (50 for Ca’ Foscari students).

Reading Room update – commentaries by Schuppe and Geyser

Now available in the Reading Room: